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Which Common Read Book Are You?

Take our Buzzfeed-style quiz to find out what common reading experience book you should be reading this year!

Which of the following describes your major the best?

  1. Science and Math
  2. Mentoring people is my passion
  3. I want to save people's lives through medicine
  4. I want to be a businessman/businesswoman
  5. I love reading a good book
  6. I like to express my creativity
  7. I like to apply my knowledge to practical things
  8. I like talking to people. A lot.
  9. I'm not entirely sure

What's your favorite spot on campus to sudy?

  1. The Rec. Center
  2. The Marshall Student Center
  3. The Library
  4. My Room
  5. Inside a classroom
  6. Anywhere outdoors with trees and squirrels

What's your ideal pet?

  1. Dogs
  2. I love cats omg lolcatz
  3. Hamsters are sooooooo cute
  4. I like fish, they're calm and nice
  5. One goat
  6. None of the above

Which one of these appeals to you the most?

  1. Attending a concert
  2. Going to the movies
  3. Going out for a nice dinner
  4. Skydiving
  5. Staying at home and relaxing
  6. Practicing my favorite sport

What's your ideal superpower?

  1. To control the elements
  2. Time control... Forever
  3. Teleportation
  4. Super Intelligence
  5. I want to read everybody's mind
  6. Invisibility... Duh

Which “Common Reading” Book Are You?

You got: Full Body Burden

Full Body Burden Book Coverkristeniversen.com

Congratulations! Your Common Reading Book is Full Body Burden, written by Kristen Iversen. Full Body Burden is a poignant work of narrative nonfiction about a young woman growing up in a small Colorado town close to Rocky Flats, a secret nuclear weapons plant once designated "the most contaminated site in America." Its the story of growing up in the shadow of the Cold War, in a landscape at once startlingly beautiful and – unknown to those who lived there – tainted with invisible yet deadly particles of plutonium.

This book best suits you because of your appeal to science and medicine. History reminds us that we cannot ignore the threat of radioactive contamination, whether it comes from nuclear power plants or nuclear weapon sites. This contamination causes devastating health-related consequences for the people living near these places. As a work of nonfiction, Full Body Burden takes a look into the lives of real people living close to Rocky Flats; people who suffered from these deadly consequences, and the impact it had on their lives. By understanding these consequences you will have a better grasp on concepts such as radioactivity and its impact on the human body, including causes and symptoms.

This book is ideal for you because you show that you care about people, and look forward to helping them and mentoring them. As you flip through the pages of this book, you will see how the author, Kristen Iversen, grew up in a loving, yet troubled family. Problems such as Kristen’s father’s alcoholism prevented her from reaching her full potential. She has, however, managed to rise above the challenges to a successful career. This is a great example to reflect on and refer to when mentoring and talking to people.

Full Body Burden is not only a compelling work of nonfiction that exposes us to the author’s life, but also reads like a mystery thriller. It combines elements of memoir, journalism, physics, environmentalism, history, social activism, and politics. Its stark reality makes it all the more frightening because of secrets within and outside the home: alcoholism, nuclear fallout, mysterious illnesses, etc. This book is ideal for avid readers, and those who enjoy any good work of literary art, and Full Body Burden is definitely a courageous life work that is well written and compelling.

This book is perfect for people that are open to learning about new things and fostering their intellect. It combines elements of memoir, journalism, physics, environmentalism, history, social activism, and politics. With potential to appeal to so many varied disciplines, this narrative nonfiction reaches a very diverse group of people. The book also explains the government’s sustained attempt to conceal the effects of the toxic and radioactive waste released in the author’s hometown, Rocky Flats, and of local residents’ failed attempts to seek justice in court.

We believe this book is ideal for you because you have shown that you like to be practical; you enjoy putting your knowledge to work and getting the job done. In Full Body Burden, we are exposed to Kristen Iversen’s world, where everything seems to be right, but there is more than meets the eye. Kristen Iversen shares all the memories from her childhood and, alongside her research, put this great piece of art together—a book about not only her life but the knowledge she gained through it.

This book discusses many different aspects of life that aren’t usually written about. Reading about new and different things is a great way to discover innovative ways to express your creativity while learning about the life of the author, Kristen Iversen. It describes the stark reality within and outside her home: alcoholism, nuclear fallout, and mysterious illnesses. This book will open your mind to new ideas and outlooks on life as it puts you in the shoes of the author to experience a new point of view that you may have never thought existed—this is why we think this is the best Common Reading Book for you.

This book best suits you because of your appeal of science and math. History reminds us that we cannot ignore the threat of radioactive contamination, whether it comes from nuclear power plants or nuclear weapon sites. This causes devastating health-related consequences for the people living near these places. As a work of nonfiction, we get to explore the impact that chemical compounds can have on day-to-day life in an otherwise perfectly normal town. We take a look into the lives of real people living close to Rocky Flats; people who suffered from these deadly consequences, and the impact it had on their lives. By understanding these consequences you will have a better grasp on concepts such as radioactivity and its impact on the human body.

This book is ideal for you because it has so many different topics that can be discussed with others. It touches on elements of memoir, journalism, physics, environmentalism, history, social activism, and even politics—all put together in this narrative nonfiction. Kristen Iversen’s excellent narrative will serve as a great starting point to learn and expand your communicational skills.

From radioactive exposure to failed attempts to seek justice in court, this book explores the many faces of what the power of man can do. Exposing an entire town to plutonium radiation without their knowledge or consent is the main theme of the book, yet Kristen Iversen explores even more than that. She touches on how the communication skills of men can come into play by trying to reveal the secrets of the town to the world.

What is the Common Reading Experience?

The Common Reading Experience is designed to provide USF students with a common intellectual experience to generate discussion, promote critical thinking, and instill a sense of community among students, faculty/staff, and alumni. The USF Common Reading Program will:

  • Unite the campus community in a shared intellectual experience that generates discussions around diverse ideas, experiences, and points of view
  • Promote dialogue and connections among students, faculty, staff, and alumni
  • Expose students to issues relevant in today’s global society
  • Bridge learning experiences inside and outside the classroom

Learn more about CRE >

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