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Archive for the ‘Dissertations & Theses’ Category

 

2014 Dissertation Forum

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses, Events by Paul Trusik | No Comments »

March 7, 9AM-4PM in Grace Allen Room, 4th Floor USF Tampa Library

Dissertation-Forum
The Forum provides resources and services for PhD candidates who are currently working on proposals, writing or revising dissertation chapters, or preparing to submit their dissertations this semester. Breakout sessions will include information about writing strategies, research tools, stress management practices and first-hand advice from recently hired Assistant Professors – all in one place!

View Schedule & Registration »

Graduate Dissertation Forum

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses, Events by Paul Trusik | No Comments »

Feb. 14, 8:30AM-4:30PM in Grace Allen Room, 4th Floor USF Tampa Library

 

 

CLICK HERE FOR FORUM SCHEDULE

 

 

dissertation forum
For Valentine’s Day this year, why not devote the day to yourself: work on the dissertation you love (or love to hate), alleviate stress, develop a concrete plan, and let us help you prepare for success.

This workshop is designed for graduate students actively developing and writing their dissertations (ie. drafting the proposal or chapters). Research and writing professionals from across the university, including librarians, writing consultants, graduate school administrators, psychologists and disciplinary specialists, will help you move forward in your writing process.

dissschedule2

Dissertation Library Guide

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses, USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

The 2012 Dissertation Forum was a great success! Thank you to all who joined us. It was a great time for networking, sharing ideas and learning how to make it through the dissertation process. Many of our presenters offered to share their materials with us. If you weren’t able to join us, or would like a refresher on the materials, please check out the Dissertation Workshop Library Guide!

Dissertation Writing Forum

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses, Events by Karen Langbehn | 1 Comment »

Calling all doctoral students!

July 18th and 19th, 2012

The Writing Center, in conjunction with the USF Tampa Library and the USF Graduate School will be hosting a dissertation forum on July 18th and 19th, 2012. Please register and join us for two days of dedicated dissertation work. You’ll meet with librarians, IRB representatives and writing consultants and leave with some serious progress made on your work!

Why Cite?

Friday, June 8th, 2012 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses, USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

Why do we bother citing someone elses work in our papers? Most people’s initial answer is so they don’t get caught plagiarizing. While that is certainly true, there are other more important reasons we cite that improve what we write.

When we conduct research, we need to cite our work to show where we found information. This gives credit to the original writer of the text you are using to support your points. It also, however, shows your reader that you conducted research and know what information is out there about your topic. Demonstrating this gives you credibility with your reader and he or she will consider you more reliable. Your reader will be more likely to trust your analysis, opinions, and ideas. (more…)

Writing a Conference Proposal

Friday, April 6th, 2012 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

Marc Wathieu CC

Many upperclassmen and graduate students strive to take part in conferences and show others the work we’ve been doing. Conferences are a great opportunity to bounce ideas off other experts in your field and get ideas for developing your work. Applying for a conference, however, can be daunting work and many are quite competitive.

If you’ve never applied to speak at a conference before, here is how the process usually works:

  • The conference will send out a “Call for Papers” (CFP) that tells everyone things like what kind of conference is being held, the conference’s theme, the requirements for proposals, and deadlines.
  • You’ll write a proposal, which is usually an abstract ranging anywhere from 200-800 words and explains you topic.
  • You send the conference folks your proposal by the deadline (miss the deadline and you’re out of luck).
  • Many conferences will conduct a “blind review.” This means that 1-3 people will read your proposal without any identifying information on it. They’ll have no idea who wrote it. The reviewers will send the abstract back to the conference committee with their recommendations of whether or not your idea is one they’d like to hear at the conference.
  • You’ll get a notice stating whether or not you were accepted. (more…)

Helpful Books for Writing Your Dissertation

Sunday, January 8th, 2012 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

Writing a dissertation or thesis can be a daunting task. If you’re looking for some books that may help motivate and focus you, try out a few on this list. The USF Library call number is provided as well, so check a few out!

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offers a list as well that you may find helpful during your writing process. http://www.library.illinois.edu/learn/tutorials/writing_tips.html

Writing the doctoral dissertation: a systematic approach.

By Gordon B. Davis, Clyde A. Parker

USF Lib: LB2369.D357

Doing your dissertation in business and management: the reality of researching and writing.

By Reva Berman Brown

USF Lib: LB2369 .B73 2006

Writing your dissertation in fifteen minutes a day: a guide to starting, revising, and finishing your doctoral thesis

By Joan Bolker

USF Lib:  LB2369 .B57 1998

Demystifying dissertation writing : a streamlined process from choice of topic to final text

By Peg Boyle Single ; foreword by Richard M. Reis.

USF Lib: LB2369 .S55 2009

How to Prepare a Dissertation Proposal: Suggestions for Students in Education and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

By David R. Krathwohl and Nick L. Smith

USF Lib: LB2369 .K723 2005

Sample Dissertation Proposals

Tuesday, November 29th, 2011 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

Writing a dissertation proposal is a daunting task. Some students find it helps to see samples while constructing their own work.

The University of Texas at Austin provides sample proposals from a wide variety of disciplines. Search for the discipline and/or topic most closely linked to your own to see how other students in your position are putting dissertation proposals together.

https://webspace.utexas.edu/cherwitz/www/ie/sample_diss.html

Thesis Proposals: Quick and Dirty

Monday, November 7th, 2011 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

The University of Massachusetts provides a quick guide to preparing and writing a thesis or dissertation proposal. Here are some key points from the article:

  1. While proposals may be had to find online, dissertations are readily available. Review the table of contents in a variety of dissertations to get an idea of what you should expect to include in your work.
  2. Talk to your advisor(s). He/She/They will know when you’re ready to write and provide insight into both the process and your own research.
  3. Organizing your thesis around conference papers can help you maintain hard deadlines.
  4. Keep your proposal between 20 and 80 pages, but check with your advisor and colleagues for the typical length.

Here is the link to the UMASS article: http://ciir.cs.umass.edu/~strohman/proposal-tips.html

Keep in mind that the guidelines listed here are specific to UMASS, but the general information may be quite useful to you.

Model Your Diss

Thursday, October 20th, 2011 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

Figuring out how to structure your dissertation can be difficult. A good idea is to look up the dissertation of a scholar you admire in your field. See how he or she wrote and structured the dissertation and consider how you might employ some of those choices in your own work.  If your research is similarly focused, you can also utilize the bibliography the scholar used to help you find more research.

Let the community of academics help you! Dissertations are readily available online, through inter-library loan and sometimes through a quick email to another library.

 

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