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Archive for the ‘USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates’ Category

 

Weekly Resource Roundup: Citing Social Media and Email

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013 | Posted in USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Claire Stephens | No Comments »

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*Photo “Social Media apps on iPhone” by Jason Howie

As digital discourse becomes more prevalent, it also becomes more relevant to our writing. Citation style  guides have, historically, been slow to produce standard citation forms for these emerging resources. This week, we want to share the best resources we’ve found for appropriately incorporating and citing emails, tweets, Facebook posts, and other forms of digital writing.

  1. Teachbyte’s handy-dandy chart shows how to cite a blog post, YouTube video, Tweet, Facebook post, and email in both APA and MLA.
  2. APA’s blog is always a great resource for citation information that may not have made it into the printed style guide yet. This post on Facebook and Twitter offers both examples and explanations.
  3. The Clever Researcher has also collected links to resources on citing social media in MLA, APA, and Chicago.

Have you found useful resources of your own for citing digital writing? Share them with us in the comments!

 

Top 3 APA Resources

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013 | Tags:
Posted in USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Claire Stephens | No Comments »

Though it’s hard to believe, we’re nearly half way through Summer A. In fact, some of you are already composing term papers and may have some pressing questions about APA. If you don’t have time to make it to the Writing Center, here are 3 places on the web that can provide some of the answers you need:

  1. The Writing Center’s APA Handout: Our APA handout aims to provide a quick reference of the key features of APA style and provides examples of the most common resources you may need cite.
  2. The APA website’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page: Because it’s updated more  often than the style guide itself, this page offers the most up-to-date information about citation practices and APA style in general. This page also contains a set of easy-to-navigate examples of common references and includes information about citing Twitter, Facebook, and websites, even websites without authors.
  3. The OWL @ Purdue’s APA Style GuideNeed a thorough explanation of all things APA? Then this is your best bet. The OWL provides information about and examples of everything from title pages to in-text citations to reference pages.

 

Fall 2012 Writing Workshops!

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012 | Posted in Events, USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | 3 Comments »

The Writing Center is offering a wide variety of workshops this fall. From finding great research to writing that awesome resume, come by and join us! No registration is required.

Check out our schedule: Study Smart Workshops fall 12

Writing Center Student Art Contest

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012 | Posted in Events, USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | 1 Comment »

USF Writing Center Student Art Competition

When you think of writing, what images come to mind?

How can written words inspire visual art?
What concepts, ideas, and people generally inspire positive writing experiences?

The purpose of this competition is to provide an opportunity for students to create artistic interpretations of what they believe writing is really about. Winners’ submissions will be displayed as décor in the Writing Center Gallery, located on the first floor of the main library. (more…)

Writing a Personal Statement

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012 | Posted in USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

Whether you’re applying to graduate school, medical school, or that awesome scholarship, chances are you’ll have to develop a personal statement to submit with your application. Personal statements go by many names – statements, letters of intent, statements of research – and is often considered to be one of the most difficult genres of writing. (more…)

Dissertation Library Guide

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses, USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

The 2012 Dissertation Forum was a great success! Thank you to all who joined us. It was a great time for networking, sharing ideas and learning how to make it through the dissertation process. Many of our presenters offered to share their materials with us. If you weren’t able to join us, or would like a refresher on the materials, please check out the Dissertation Workshop Library Guide!

USF Students Improve Skills at the Writing Center

Thursday, June 21st, 2012 | Posted in USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

From John Strasser, Spring 2012:

“I want to thank you for all that you and the writing center have done for me. As I have stated over and over again to both you and anyone that will listen at USF, the Writing Center is the most important resource on the entire campus; the majority of academic successes that I have experienced have come as a result of the Center’s help.

I am proud to tell you that I was offered admission to The South Asia Institute within The Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at Columbia University to pursue a master’s degree this past week. I worked on my CV and Statement of Purpose at the Writing Center.

Additionally, on the same day that I received the formal offer of admission from Columbia, I won the Golden Bull Award, one of the highest honors bestowed on a student at USF. Out of a pool of 110 qualified candidates, only 20 students were chosen. This honor, too, is a direct result of the skills I learned and the grades I earned as a result of attending Writing Center appointments.”

Thanks for the feedback, John! We’re so excited for your achievements and look forward to hearing about the great things you’ll continue to do!

Why Cite?

Friday, June 8th, 2012 | Posted in Dissertations & Theses, USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | No Comments »

Why do we bother citing someone elses work in our papers? Most people’s initial answer is so they don’t get caught plagiarizing. While that is certainly true, there are other more important reasons we cite that improve what we write.

When we conduct research, we need to cite our work to show where we found information. This gives credit to the original writer of the text you are using to support your points. It also, however, shows your reader that you conducted research and know what information is out there about your topic. Demonstrating this gives you credibility with your reader and he or she will consider you more reliable. Your reader will be more likely to trust your analysis, opinions, and ideas. (more…)

Trying to Avoid Colloquial Language and Slang

Friday, May 18th, 2012 | Posted in USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | 2 Comments »

“Like, you know, that guy over there told me to say hi.”

“Guys and girls! Everyone look here!”

“I have to take my kid sister to school, then we can hang out.

Slang is everywhere.  When we use it in everyday life to communicate with friends informally, it’s usually fine. In fact, sounding too formal around our friends is kinda weird.  Slang, or colloquial language – to use the formal term – is not appropriate in academic writing and many professional communication situations. (more…)

Concision

Thursday, May 17th, 2012 | Posted in USF Writing Center Blog: Tips, News, and Updates by Karen Langbehn | 1 Comment »

Remember learning all those long, complicated words for the SAT? While it’s good to know what these words mean and how they can be used, using them in our own writing isn’t always a good plan. Sometimes brevity is the best way to express an idea.

But why should we bother when we took all that time to learn those long words?

Unnecessary words can make us sound like we lack confidence in our writing. Redundant words, for example, give the same idea twice. Here are some examples: Twelve noon (noon is always at twelve); Summarize briefly (summaries are brief by nature); Exactly the same (the same is the same, right?).

Use your words carefully and purposefully. There’s a reason the cliché “short and sweet” has stuck around for so long!

Here’s a great video on using simple words to express big ideas:  “The Power of Simple Words”

 

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